WHOLE LOD OF LOVE, AT 20th ANNUAL WINTERFEST IN ASBURY

It’s still just scratching the surface…but some of the faces of this weekend’s 20th anniversary Light of Day Winterfest schedule include (top row) Marc Ribler, Sandy Mack, Deseree Spinks, Marc Muller, Jarod Clemons, Sara Aniano (New Narratives), Bobby Mahoney, Quincy Mumford, Stella Mrowicki, Pat Guadagno; (2nd row) Lisa Bouchelle, Taylor Tote, Cranston Dean, Billy Hector, Christine Martucci, Rachel Ana Dobken, Tara Dente, Avery Mandeville, Stringbean, Dr. Geena; (3rd row) David Ross Lawn, Bob Egan, John Easdale (Dramarama), Richard Barone, Jo Wymer, Poppa John Bug, Mary McCrink, Joe D’Urso; (4th row, hidden) We’re Ghosts Now, Shady Street Show Band; (5th row) James Dalton, JT Bowen, Stormin’ Norman Seldin, Chuck Lambert, Jo Bonanno, Billy Walton, Keith Roth, Emily Bornemann (Dentist), Paul Whistler, Reagan Richards (Williams Honor); (6th/ bottom row) Anthony “Remember Jones” D’Amato, Glen Burtnik (The Weeklings), John Eddie, Joe Rapolla, Anthony Krizan, Joe Grushecky, Vini Lopez, Jeffrey Gaines, James Maddock, Willie Nile.

Published in The Coaster (Asbury Park, NJ) and The Link (Long Branch, NJ), January 16, 2020

It’s a milestone menu of musical movings and shakings that was appetized by several local and regional events in the past week — one that lays out its spectacularly sprawling spread over the next four days; a benefit banquet that involves some 34 separate sites, dozens of distinct events, and enough performers to populate one little but LOUD, gloriously music-mad city.

Where to even begin to get a handle on Light of Day Winterfest, the fully soundtracked fundraising vehicle whose landmark 20th annual edition achieves climax this mid-January weekend? For perspective’s sake, it might behoove us to start at the very beginning — in this case the original Downtown Cafe in Red Bank; scene in November 1998 of a tune-filled 40th birthday party thrown by Bob Benjamin. Having received a diagnosis of Parkinson’s Disease two years earlier, the music promo/ management pro asked his guests to forego the birthday presents in favor of donating toward Parkinson’s research — and it was there that Jean Mikle found herself on the ground floor of a thing that the Asbury Park Press journalist and Bruce Springsteen specialist says “has grown beyond anyone’s imagination…something that’s had such a positive impact on the community.”

The thing is the Light of Day Foundation, of which Mikle serves as president, and whose other board members include co-founder and premier promoter Tony Pallagrosi, as well as veteran music makers Joe D’Urso, Joe Grushecky and Rob Dye. As a year-round nonprofit endeavor with an international footprint, “LOD” has raised millions toward the goal of a cure for Parkinson’s — in addition to Joan Dancy & PALS, the ALS-focused charity founded by the late Terry McGovern — although the casual observer might be forgiven for first thinking of the organization as the planners and purveyors of a most auspicious party.

An ever-evolving affair that’s expanded its reach to several continents, major North American cities, and various satellite events throughout the calendar year, Winterfest commandeers the stages, storefronts and saloons of Asbury Park (as well as one sympathetic site in next-door Ocean Grove) in a manner that’s guaranteed to disturb the long winter’s nap of most other “off season” Shore locales. It’s a phenomenon that manifests as a natural outgrowth of the event’s symbiotic relationship with the city, where it first established base camp at the Stone Pony in 2000 — and to which it returned in 2008, after several years at surrogate homes in Sayreville and Sea Bright. By that time, Asbury Park had re-asserted itself as a music city that competed head-on with places many times its size — a “spiritual home” that finds Mikle “just amazed by the diversity and the depth of talent we have here.”

That deep bench will be on full active roster between tonight, January 16 and Sunday, January 19; represented by multiple generations of homegrown heroes, honorary local legends, and transplants to our music-friendly Shore. As Mikle (who recently accompanied D’Urso on the Fests’s European jaunt for the ninth time) explains it, “the fact that we have access to so many different musicians on this scene…and our out-of-town friends look forward to coming back each year…means we grow bigger each time out.”

Naturally, a big draw (and a focal point for some tantalizing will-he-or-won’t-he buzz) is the potential participation of Benjamin’s long-time friend Springsteen — whose soundtrack song “Just Around the Corner to the Light of Day” directly inspired the organization’s name, and whose frequent presence has made him de facto ringmaster for the majority of those all-star Bob’s Birthday concerts. 

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LIVE, LOCAL & LOYAL, RIGHT HERE IN MUSIC CITY

Published in The Coaster (Asbury Park, NJ) and The Link (Long Branch, NJ), November 14, 2019

 LOYALTY! It’s a concept that only truly functions as a two-way street — mind you don’t get thrown ‘neath one of those passing buses — and one that arguably attains its highest calling in that special relationship between singer/ band and audience. And, as Jeff Warshauer puts it, “in a time where 40,000 tracks get uploaded to Spotify every day and music is being relegated to the background, it is very important that we facilitate a deeper connection between artist and fan, and elevate the local music scene.”

Here along the Monmouth County Shore, that epicenter of the NJ music community (where sounds are a cash crop and principal export), the emergence and influx of new musical acts in recent years (added to an already substantial scene’s worth of veteran acts) fairly cries out for a reliable guide — and with that in mind, Warshauer developed Asbury Park-based Live Music Loyalty as a mobile app that focuses on “helping musicians connect with their fans and grow their audience” — a mission accomplished via comprehensive live music listings, detailed artist profiles, and an option that encourages fans “to check in to events so artists know who come see them play” (there’s also a recommended playlist each week, spotlighting tacts who are locally based, or who’ve paid a recent visit).

Having made its mark, with remarkable momentum, upon the scene’s screens, Live Music Loyalty takes its next quantum leap into the brick and mortar meatworld, with a pair of (concurrent but connected) multi-band “takeover” events this Saturday night, November 16. Beginning at 9:30 pm, the hallway between a pair of sister saloons on the Asbury boardwalk (Marilyn Schlossbach’s Langosta Lounge, and Asbury Park Yacht Club) is the two-way street that allows access to two stages worth of “Scene by the Sea” sounds, with Langosta serving up ace showband Secret Sound, plus the Mike Montrey Band and Matt Cook — while APYC sets sail with The Shoobies, Natalie Farrell, and The Foes of Fern. There’s no cover charge, and proceeds from purchases of products from drink special sponsors Last Wave Brewery and Shipwreck Rum go directly to the youth music education programs of the Asbury Park Music Foundation.

As Warshauer explains it, “Asbury Park is such an unbelievable community, and we need to make sure our artists don’t get drowned out by the noise” — but if ever a scene kicked up a glorious noise of its own, it’s this one; a year-round bash that spans the genres and the generations, and that anymore refuses to abide by the tired old concept of the “off season.”

Embedded within the evolution of the present-day scene is the phenomenon of the musician turned impresario/ promoter/ ringmaster of their own branded events — and the coming nights offer two exciting examples at live music venues in Long Branch. Tonight, November 14, the Freehold-based folks behind the fast-growing surf/ tiki label Hi-Tide Recordings (that’s Magdalena O’Connell and her husband, Black Flamingos drummer Vincent Minervino) return to Whitechapel Projects, as they welcome Rochester, NY’s retro pop trio The Hi-Risers (with some set-up spins by the ever-enigmatic DJ Hi-Tide). Then on Friday, the forever Home of Original Music on the Jersey Shore — that’s Greg Macolino’s Brighton Bar in wild West End — gives the floor to pioneer punk/crunch/skronk drummer Reg “Satana” Hogan, as the veteran pacesetter and recently minted promoter showcases a bill toplined by the buzzed-about band Shut Up, and featuring Reg’s own recent project, the trio 19DRT.

Another homegrown performer whose skills in both nightclub/concert and theatrical settings have served him well as a showman — the ever-industrious Anthony “Remember Jones” D’Amato — takes the Stone Pony stage on Saturday night, as frontman for the latest feather in his career cap; a little combo known as Everyone Orchestra. Under the baton of Matt Butler, it’s “a blissful, masterfully conducted, fully spontaneous explosion of live music created by a rotating cast of world renowned musicians” — in this case including such awesome instrumentalists as pedal-steel paragon Robert Randolph and sought-after session guitarist Vernon (Living Colour) Reid. Check our music listings on page 31 for particulars — and check in around town that night for no-cover sets by local lights Quincy Mumford (Robinson Ale House) and Alex English (Soundbooth Lounge at The Asbury Hotel).

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REMEMBER JONES WELCOMES YOU TO TOMMY’S HOLIDAY CAMP

An all-star team of talents celebrates the 50th anniversary of The Who’s rock opera TOMMY, with three performances of a special concert adaptation in Ocean Township.

Published in The Coaster (Asbury Park, NJ) and The Link (Long Branch, NJ), September 5, 2019

Rain or shine, the Labor Day holiday just passed is traditionally a time of last-licks recreation and relaxation for most; a somewhat arbitrary DMZ between the interlude in which we are expected to “make memories,” and that in which we return our attentions to the great filled-beyond-capacity IN box of our lives.

Not so much Anthony D’Amato. Given his superhuman schedule and otherworldly work ethic, the singer/actor/ bandleader/ producer/ director and master-showman impresario best known these days as Remember Jones can be forgiven for maybe not knowing what season it is, which tour stop on the itinerary, or even exactly which full-length show he’s performing at this moment.

In truth, however, the new heir to the mantle of Hardest Working Man in Shore Business remains completely in command of his faculties, his frankly awesome musical organization, and his vision for a continuously evolving career that’s seen the big Remember Jones band crisscross the country as crowdpleasing ambassadors for the Jersey Shore scene — all the while continuing to explore (and stake a significant claim to) nearly every corner of the popular music landscape.

Having just come in off the road from an extensive 30-city tour — and keeping the momentum going with shows in Atlantic City and Long Beach Island — Mr. Jones and company ushered in September with a full-set outdoor concert at Asbury’s Springwood Park — the capper to a “Funky Fresh Market” event that found D’Amato also lining up the numerous opening acts, coordinating the food trucks, and pretty much taking on everything short of serving as parking valet.

Labor Day proper found the troupe devoting the entirety of that alleged day of rest to some intensive rehearsals for their latest project:, TOMMY in Concert — an all-star, golden anniversary salute to that game-changing album of the classic rock era; one that commandeers the auditorium of the Axelrod Performing Arts Center for three performances this Saturday and Sunday, September 7 and 8.

Speaking at the end of a ten-hour rehearsal session at the Ocean Township venue where he mounted an acclaimed concert version of HAIR in 2018, D’Amato/Jones confides that “they wanted me to do a Woodstock celebration as a follow-up, but I felt that it had kind of been played out by this point…I wanted to do something different; a full recreation of The Who’s original Tommy that will make you believe you’re ‘hearing it again for the first time’.”

While it shares a 50th anniversary with that generation-defining festival — and while it did manage to have a presence on the Woodstock stage, as The Who performed some of its score during their featured set — Pete Townshend’s rock opera of a deaf-dumb-and-blind kid represents a bit of of a break with the spirit of those Three Days of Mud and Music on Max Yasgur’s farm. Taking off from Townshend’s earlier character-driven songs (plus little mini-epics like “A Quick One While He’s Away”), and inspired in part by his own spiritual explorations, Tommy has some pointed things to say about twisted family dynamics, self-imposed isolation, cults of personality, plus the many temptations and weirdnesses of life on post-WWII planet Earth.

 As the Tommy phenomenon took hold of the popular imagination, the ambitious rock record project took on a whole other life of its own; first with a 1972 orchestral album that boasted contributions from Ringo Starr, Rod Stewart, and Richie Havens among others — and, eventually, a Tony winning Broadway musical that departed somewhat from past incarnations, in terms of song selection and the relationships of the characters.

In between appeared Tommy: The Movie, a 1975 carnival from director Ken Russell that starred Who singer Roger Daltrey in the title role — and that paired the first-time actor with a supporting cast that included Ann-Margret, Jack Nicholson, Oliver Reed, and (as the Pinball Wizard), a height-of-his-popularity Elton John. Still, while the Remember Jones conception of Tommy takes some crucial cues from these past endeavors, this golden-jubilee tribute promises to be a thing unto iteself.

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DIG IN TO THOSE IN-DIG-ENOUS SOUNDS THAT ABOUND ALL AROUND

L-R; Karl Denson (August 23), Billy Hector (August 24), JT Bowen (August 24) and The Sensational Soul Cruisers (August 25 PLUS August 27) are among the foundational sounds to be found in days to come, here within NJ’s capital community for live music.

Published in The Coaster (Asbury Park, NJ) and The Link (Long Branch, NJ), August 22, 2019

 It’s known as “indigenous music” in certain scholarly and appreciative circles — and, while it doesn’t connote the sort of sounds that might have been in the air before the first settles arrived on this shore, it’s all about the Jazz and the Blues (and, by extension, pretty much everything else) that form the backstory of America. Here in NJ’s capital community for live music, the place where the sand meets the surf has also historically been a place where diverse groups of people meet up; in ways that have spanned the spectrum from tinderbox-tense to terrifically tuneful.

With arguably more original music organizations working this patch of sandy soil than ever before, more places to put ‘em in — and a heightened sense of the Shore scene’s past, present, and future — it’s no accident that numerous nonprofit entities have stepped up with a shared mission to both preserve the best of the past, and to promote the now and next generation of players. Orgs like the Asbury Park Music Foundation, the nascent African American Music Project, the Red Bank-based Jazz Arts Project, and the Lakehouse Academy continue to make their presence felt in a myriad of ways — but for sheer continuity and consistency of cause, they’ve all got to tip their hat to the 30-plus years’ mission of the Jersey Shore Jazz and Blues Foundation.

“It’s a passion with me…I do it to support live music,” says Tom Baldino, a retired banker who first joined the all-volunteer JSJBF “around the turn of the century…that sounds like a long time ago!” — and who has served as the organization’s president for the past seven years.

“I go back a few years myself…the first show I ever saw was Jackie Wilson at Convention Hall, in 1959,” adds the graduate of Asbury Park High School (and veteran of numerous teen-years jobs on the boardwalk). “I was supposed to be at the movies that night…but I ditched the Mayfair to attend that show, and I’m glad I did.”

While the lifelong music fan remembers the Asbury of the late 1950s and 1960s as “a magical time to be there…I even got to sneak into the old Orchid Lounge once or twice,” his focus remains very much rooted in the here and now — with a particular emphasis on the annual Jersey Shore Jazz and Blues Festival, the 2019 edition of which goes up this Saturday, August 24 on the Great Lawn area of the Long Branch boardwalk.

Running between 1 and 9 pm — and followed immediately thereafter by a display of fireworks — the one-day event assembles an eclectic collection of pure jazz, R&B, electric blues and bluesrock artists from across the region for the ninth year on the LB waterfront (following a single year’s stand at Monmouth Park). It’s a more concentrated successor to the weekend-long festivals that were once hosted at Red Bank’s Marine Park — large-scale affairs that, while regularly boasting some pretty awesome national/ international names, often had to take a seat as Mother Nature blew the meanest solos (folks still whisper of that fateful and fogged-out night when an allstar band of festival refugees, including Levon Helm, David Johansen, and Howlin’ Wolf guitarist Hubert Sumlin, commandeered the now-defunct Olde Union House restaurant for an impromptu jam that made Shore music history before getting shut down by the fire department after just two songs).

By contrast, “we’ve been really lucky with the weather since we moved to Long Branch…and the people of the city have been really supportive of us, beginning with Barry Stein, as well as the police, Public Works…and I’ve got to give a shout out to Mayor Pallone and his staff, who’ve been so accommodating, and who have allowed us to continue our mission.”

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IT’S “OUTDOOR VOICES, PLEASE,” AS SUMMER CONCERTS KEYNOTE

Jo Bonanno and the Godsons of Soul summon the “Spirit of Asbury Park” in a free July 14 concert on the West End Beach.

Published in The Coaster (Asbury Park, NJ) and The Link (Long Branch, NJ), June 6, 2019

Imagine if you will a summer concert event with your choice of first-come/first-served seating. No shuttle queues, no turnstile patdowns, no confiscated cameras, water bottles, umbrellas or Pringles packs. And best of all, no platinum-club pricing levels or service charges. In the words of Zappa, it’s all Absolutely FREE, so you low-budget Lotharios and daddy-track Don Juans can do your cheap-date thing.

Yes, it’s Free Outdoor Concert Season again — and from Avon on up to Sea Bright, the boardwalks, beaches, and bandshells are getting set to welcome a beach-blanket brigade of neighbors in search of some savvy sounds, ‘neath the setting sun and stars. It’s a musical menu that runs the gamut from operatic arias, big band jazz, and streetcorner soul, to show-band grooves, acoustic Americana, Latin jams, garage rock, hip hop, and all stylistic territory between. And did we mention FREE?

While the late-spring breezes have already been tested by various festival performers (as well as by hardy souls like Stringbean and the Boardwalk Social Club, in session Monday evenings outside Langosta Lounge, and Wednesdays at Anchor’s Bend), the plein-air panorama starts in earnest right here and now — so grab your freshly webbed lawn chairs and broken-in blankets, and enjoy the complimentary sunsets and the prime people-watching opportunities.

ASBURY PARK

With the Atlantic waves and the whole wide-screen sky as the backdrop, few live music settings are as made-to-order as that of Jams on the Sand, the annual series that stakes out the beach-top bandstand, bar and dance floor of Anchor’s Bend off the north side of the good ship Convention Hall. While attendees are encouraged to come on down and enjoy the specialties of the Bend’s kitchen and cocktail crew, all are welcome to take in the show from the boardwalk “mezzanine,”starting on June 20 with midwest funk/rock unit The Main Squeeze — and continuing Thursdays at 5 pm through August 29 with a diverse dance card of Asbury returnees (guitar prodigy Brandon “Taz” Niederauer, July 18; JAZZ is PHSH, August 15) and buzzworthy newcomers (New England jam juggernaut Percy Hill, June 27; “gospel ninja soul” exponent Zach Deputy, July 4). Each date also boasts an After Party set spotlighting some of the Shore’s finest, at the nearby Wonder Bar.

June 20: The Main Squeeze/ Ron Artis II & the Truth. June 27: Percy Hill/ After Funk. July 4: Zach Deputy/ Shady Street Show Band. July 11: Southern Avenue/ Mike Montrey Band. July 18: Brandon “Taz” Niederauer/ Dogs in a Pile. July 25: Chris Jacobs/ Evanoff. Aug. 8: E.N. Young/ The Pembertones. Aug. 15: JAZZ is PHSH/ Funky Dawgz Brass Band. Aug. 22: Mystic Bowie’s Talking Dread/ Secret Sound. Aug. 29: Bella’s Bartok/ Kat Wright.

Just announced — and returning on Wednesday evenings to the “First Avenue Green” across Ocean Avenue from the Stone Pony SummerStage — the Asbury Park LIVE series showcases double (and even triple) bills of some of the area’s best makers of original music. The 6:30 pm events programmed by the nonprofit Asbury Park Music Foundation (and sponsored by MOGO Tacos) float their first note on June 26 with an indie-pop serenade starring Asbury’s own Sonic Blume and frequent AP guests The Vaughns — and the series continues each Wednesday (save 7/17) through August 28, with the spotlight on such local luminaries as Black Suburbia Music Group, Dark City Strings, Pamela Flores, Rachel Ana Dobken, The Vansaders, and Waiting For Mongo, to name but a very few (proceeds benefit the Asbury Park Music Foundation, on whose Facebook page you’ll find complete schedule details).

June 26: Sonic Blume/ The Vaughns. July 3: Dark City Strings/ Jackson Pines. July 10: Waiting On Mongo/ Whodat!. July 24: Black Suburbia Music Group/ Blaise/ Pamela Flores. July 31: Latewaves/ Well Wisher/ Extensions. Aug. 7: The Vansaders/ Tide Bends/ Sunshine Spazz. Aug. 14: Rachel Ana Dobken/ Mercury Brothers. Aug. 21: Vendetta Rose/ Brian Wood & Co. Aug. 28: Connor Bracken & the Mother Leeds Band/ Shoobies.

The APMF is also the driving force behind the returning MUSIC MONDAYS at Springwood Park, the series that brought live music back to the West Side with a mix of legandary veterans (Ray Goodman & Brown; Gary U.S. Bonds) and rising local luminaries. While the 2019 schedule hasn’t been announced as we go to press, mark those calendars for the inaugural event on June 24; with shows continuing each Monday at 7 pm (and a finale starring the Sensational Soul Cruisers on Tuesday, August 27).

If there’s one summer diversion that can trace a direct line back to the old-timey days when the Shore’s first music superstar Arthur Pryor and his famous march orchestra held court on the boardwalk, it’s the Asbury Park Concert Band, the multi-generational institution that returns to the boards (outside Robinson Ale House, at Fifth Avenue) on the evening of Wednesday, July 3 — and then each Thursday thereafter through August 29. Now under the baton of longtime director John Luckenbill, the band plays a schedule of special themed 7 pm concerts, to be announced imminently by the APMF (asburyparkmusiclives.org).

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COME FOR THE MUSIC, STAY FOR THE FILM, AT APMFF 2019

An era-defining inductee of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame; a next-generation scion of one of American music’s most awesome bloodlines; a foundational figure from the big musical house that Bruce built — and a producer-director whose most recent project earned the Academy Award for Best Picture. All in a weekend’s work — and maybe all at the next table over, here in an ever-accelerating Asbury Park entertainment scene. But with the arrival of the Asbury Park Music and Film Festival, the celebrity-spotting carries a positively charged connection to the city’s rich cultural legacy, and to the young performers who will carry that torch into the future, and the wide world beyond the boardwalk.

Beginning with a special screening and jam session tonight, April 25 at the Paramount Theatre, and soldiering on through the weekend days and nights ahead, it’s the fifth annual edition of the sprawling event that originated under the auspices of the hard-working Asbury Park Music Foundation — and which serves as a high-profile fundraising vehicle for the nonprofit APMF and its ongoing endeavors in the fields of musical education, historical preservation, and live-concert presentation.

Coordinated in its earliest days by Matt Hockenjos (profiled in this space recently, in his role as drummer for alterna-surfpop band Dentist), the festival is guided these days by principals that include Sony Pictures Classics co-president Tom Bernard, Grammy nominated photographer-filmmaker (plus Sea.Hear.Now Festival founder) Danny Clinch, and Asbury Park Press publisher Tom Donovan. The board of directors, an august group of music biz pros, filmmakers and philanthropists, boasts such names as the Grammy Museum’s Bob Santelli, Batman franchise producer Michael Uslan, and radio personality Shelli Sonstein. What hasn’t changed is the core theme of “exploring music in film” — a mission that’s brought the likes of Bruce, Little Steven, Wyclef Jean, Doors drummer John Densmore, and Asbury’s own movie-biz mover ‘n shaker Danny De Vito to the festival’s stages — as well as the call “to benefit underserved youth in Asbury Park,” through organizations like the Boys and Girls Clubs, the “traveling “Beat Bus” program, and the after-school program of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel church.

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IT’S A 3-DAY, V-day WEEKEND IN ASBURY TOWN

Published in The Coaster, Asbury Park NJ, February 14 2019

Ah yes, Valentine’s Day — the candy kisses and the cardboard Cupids; the sweet swirl of the sauvignon and the scent of Sunoco station roses; the prix fixe menu and the pure peer pressure of participating in a “romantic” ritual designed to make the unattached feel like they’re little more than…

Whoa, wait a minute now…that’s Anti-Valentine’s talk, and that’s an avenue that was explored to fine effect just this past Wednesday, when the Asbury Hotel hosted its Anti- V-day songwriting competition. But beginning tonight, February 14 — and continuing on through an extended interlude of concert events and variety vaudevilles — the venues in and around Asbury Park have you Casanovas covered in style, with a choice of entertainments (ranging from hyper-current to classic retro) that are all about the Live and the Love.

Among the most highly visible of the weekend’s events are not just one but two major manifestations of the modern art of Burlesque — a Burlesque-a-pades in Loveland revue that commandeers the stage at House of Independents this Friday, and a NJ Burlesque Valentine’s Show that returns to the Asbury on Saturday. Scroll it down for more details on these exemplars of the art form’s “newly re-energized, multi-gender encompassing, even empowering next wave.”

Following up on that theme of everything old being new again, the Valentine’s interval is a time in which the classic sounds of Great American Songbook pop, vintage soul serenades, and timeless jazz jams come once more to the fore — and it’s no coincidence that all of those genres have been well represented at the Brown Performing Arts Center, the intimate storefront space operated by elegant crooner Bill Brown at 312 Main Street in downtown Asbury.

A little too intimate, it can be said, to meet the demands of V-day’s romantic rush — so with that in mind, Brown has re-teamed with the more spacious Mister C’s Bistro on the Allenhurst waterfront, programming a three-night dinner/show residency that finds the singer holding court there on February 14 and 15. Then on Saturday the 16th, Bill’s buddy Bobby Valli (pictured) — brother to Jersey Boy-for-all-seasons Frankie, and a seasoned performer in his own right — closes out the stand, with available seating for any of the three shows ($69 per person) reserved by calling 732-531-3665.

Upside Tim McLoone’s Supper Club on the Asbury boards, one of the greatest non-rock albums of the classic-rock era is celebrated in style on Friday night, when Asbury’s own Chris Pinnella (himself profiled in these pages back in December) channels the legendary Chairman of the Board in a special salute to Sinatra at the Sands, the Rat Pack artifact that found Ol’ Blue Eyes singing, swinging and swaggering at peak powers, backed by fellow Jerseyan Count Basie’s band (including a next-generation arranger by name of Quincy Jones). The 8 pm event — for which Chris has shared that he won’tbe recreating Sinatra’s sign-of-their-times comic monologues — has sold out as we post this, but fans will be able to reconnect with Pinnella as he honors a regional music master of a different era, Billy Joel, at the Asbury Hotel on March 23.

Valentine’s Day proper finds the Supper Club stage playing host to an altogether different act: From Blue to Greene, the acoustic duo that pairs singer-songsmith-guitarist Austin Vuolo with vocalist and multi-instrumentalist Kaela Fanelli. The 6 pm dinner/show event ($49.95) represents the first of two opportunities to catch the twosome this weekend, as they take it downstairs to Robinson Ale House on Saturday night. Continue reading

IT’S JUST AROUND THE CORNER: LIGHT OF DAY KEEPS THE AP HOME FIRES LIT

Published in The Coaster, Asbury Park NJ, January 17 2019

To hear the man tell it, “Longevity is a benchmark of greatness” — and given that the speaker is Tony Pallagrosi, the words are no mere fridge-magnet platitude. After all, this is the veteran music scene mover ‘n shaker whose unimpeachable cred extends from his days as one of the cats in the band (The Shots, The Asbury Jukes), to host of some much-missed Shore nightspots (The FastLane, Xanadu), to co-founder of major concert venues and promotion entities (Starland Ballroom, Concerts East), to manager of The Weeklings — and quite possibly all the way to “the other side,” thanks to Asbury Angels, the musical memorial initiative that he chairs.

Pallagrosi, however, isn’t referring to himself, or to any of those aforementioned feathers in his cap, but to the endeavor that may ultimately stand as his most lasting legacy: Light of Day, the music-driven fundraising vehicle that’s  illuminated some of the darkest winter days and nights in this City of Summers for well nigh two decades.

Co-founded by Pallagrosi with music promo/ management pro Bob Benjamin as an awareness resource for Parkinson’s Disease research — and inspired by Benjamin’s own diagnosis with the disorder — the annual slate of star-studded happenings grew out of a 40th birthday party for Bob at the Stone Pony; taking its name from the Springsteen soundtrack song “Just Around the Corner to the Light of Day” on its way to becoming a sprawling affair that’s spanned several continents, major North American cities and additional satellite events throughout the calendar year.

Of course, along the way Light of Day became indelibly identified with the stamp of Benjamin’s long-time friend Bruce Springsteen — not just via the organization’s name, but in the very real presence of The Boss as an onstage participant and de facto ringmaster for the majority of those all-star Bob’s Birthday concerts. As an undeniable draw (and a focal point for some tantalizing will-he-or-won’t-he buzz each year), the Bard of the boardwalk has generously shared the stage with a core cast of frequent-flyer performers (including Joe Grushecky, Willie Nile, and Steve Forbert), as well as drop-in guest stars that have ranged from Southside Johnny, Darlene Love and Gary US Bonds, to Light of Day movie star (plus high-profile person with Parkinson’s) Michael J. Fox, and  The Sopranos’ Vincent Pastore.

While the nonprofit Light of Day Foundation is a year-round entity upon which the sun never sets, the heart and soul of the positively charged enterprise remains LOD Winterfest, the mid-January jamboree of activity that commandeers the stages, storefronts and saloons of Asbury Park during the post-holiday “off season” interlude when most other Shore towns are deep into a long winter’s nap. Having offered up a couple of preliminary pace-setter events on January 13 (see the feature on Bob Burger in last week’s Coaster), the circus comes to town in full force for a long weekend that begins tonight, January 17, with a choice of tuneful entertainments that includes a “Hall of Fame Jam” featuring veteran Bruce drummer Vini Lopez (Langosta Lounge), a special edition of Sandy Mack’s Wonder Jam at the Wonder Bar, and an official kickoff concert at downtown’s House of Independents that spotlights such next-gen talents as Williams Honor and Anthony “Remember Jones” D’Amato.

“No other town this small has such a vibrant music scene,” says Pallagrosi. “And at the end of the day, I want everyone involved.”

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